<< The Bountiful Benefits of Breastfeeding

The Breast Milk vs. Formula Debate >>

Surviving Breastfeeding by Frankie Dahl

June 28, 2011 by Frankie     1

After my daughter was born, she was weighed, briefly poked and prodded, and all her digits were accounted for. Swaddled and squirming, she was then laid onto my stomach, and with no hesitation she made eye contact with me and latched onto my right breast. After a long pregnancy filled with worry and stress, this was a very simple but profound act for me. I sighed the deepest sigh possible, the room melted away and it was just her and I. Baby brain and sleep depravation, that cruel but inevitable duo, take away a lot of your memories, but I will never forget that moment.

Every baby book, every baby blog and every baby professional (aka my mother) stresses how important breastfeeding is for your newborn. Emotionally, the bond between the newborn baby and the new mama is cemented with breastfeeding. Health-wise, not only is breastfeeding the cheapest and most convenient option, breast milk has the perfect balance of nutrients for your baby. Looking at the bigger picture, breastfeeding can increase the child's immunity to disease and infection, and down the road breast-fed babies are less likely to be obese, or develop osteoporosis and allergies like eczema.

Creating the perfect environment for the feedings (of which there will be a lot in the first few weeks) is vital. Choose a comfortable chair and have a nursing pillow on hand. Always have a tall glass of water for yourself within reach. For some reason, maybe it's the calories you burn (an unexpected great bonus of breastfeeding) but it turns out breastfeeding is thirsty business. Invest in a good collection of button down shirts, for ease of whipping out the desired appendage when baby is impatiently waiting for their next meal, and the cutest nursing bras you can find. Finally, have a tube of Lanolin for every room in the house. There's no safe or practical way to prep your poor nipples for the onslaught they will take when the baby starts feeding, so you'll need to slather them in lanolin to keep them from doing terrible things like cracking or bleeding.

Having said all this, what if, for any number of reasons, you're physically unable to breastfeed? If the baby is not latching, and breast compression or breast expression is resulting in you coming up dry, all is not lost. Domperidone, a medication usually prescribed for disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, to the rescue. As a happy accident, it's been discovered that a side effect of the medication Domperidone, and its generic equivalent Motilium, is increased production of the hormone prolactin. Prolactin is the hormone that stimulates the cells in the mother's breast to produce milk.

Sure, you've been carrying that baby around with you for almost ten months, but once it comes forth into the world, the bond deepens to a new plane if you are able to continue nurturing and nourishing their little bodies the natural way by breastfeeding.

Filed under: Breastfeeding Online.

Tags: domperidone breastfeeding, motilium for breastfeeding, motilium lactation, motilium for children, motilium for babies, tips for brestfeeding, domperidone information.

Comments:

Kenneth McMillan says at 2011-10-05 16:35:49:
I have been using domperidone for two years now, I have suffered little or no side effects of this drug.

Leave your comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *.

Name (required, limit 30 characters)

Email (required, will not be published)

Your Comment

Enter Code (not case-sensitive)